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The punishments for speeding

The offence of speeding is one of the most common offences committed by people within the UK. Indeed, speeding is now so common that when filling in a job application form, most employers will ask if you have any criminal convictions other than speeding.

Whilst this highlights the number of people that are caught speeding, there are different levels of punishment in regard to how fast you are travelling over the limit.

If you are charged with speeding you may wish to seek legal advice. However, if the punishment is not particularly harmful to you it may be more cost effective to avoid contacting a solicitor.

Speeding is an offence and, whilst it may not carry the stigma of many other criminal offences (partly due to the amount of people that are caught every year), it is still a criminal offence.

The punishments

If you are caught speeding then you will be handed an absolute minimum punishment of three penalty points and a fine of £100.

If you are a repeat offender then you are likely to receive a much fiercer punishment. Indeed, if you accrue 12 points on your licence within a three-year period you will receive a driving ban, most likely to be around 12 months depending on the individual circumstances.

Other motoring offences

It is important to note that you will be liable to be punished to a greater extent should you cause other offences whilst speeding. The most obvious of these is dangerous driving.

If your driving is considered to fall far below that of the reasonable competent driver then you can be charged with dangerous driving, which carries a sentence of up to two years imprisonment.

Other offences include drink driving, for which you will be asked to take a breath test (refusal to take the breath test is in itself an offence if it is done without a valid medical reason) and if your blood-alcohol level is over the legal limit you will be guilty of an offence regardless of your circumstances.

If you are arrested for dangerous driving or drink driving you should contact a solicitor immediately for legal advice.

Excessive speed categories

Whilst most people that are caught speeding receive a fine and points on their licence that is usually because they are travelling above the speed limit by less than 20%. However, there are cases where individuals break the speed limit by a long way, which in turn can lead to a greater punishment.

A court will generally break excessive speed into two categories, whether it was on the motorway or not on the motorway. Although a Judge will have discretion, as a general rule if you are travelling over 30 miles per hour above the speed limit whilst not on a motorway you are likely to be disqualified from driving for at least 12 months depending on your past history.

If you are driving on a motorway, and exceed 100 miles per hour then again you are likely to face disqualification of a similar nature.

Unfortunately many people die each year as a result of car accidents which often could have been prevented, or at least injuries minimised, had the individuals involved stuck to the speed limit. It is for this reason that the courts must punish those who break it. But as can be seen from the above, for the more serious punishments the individual circumstances will be looked at in addition to your past record.

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