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Pet quarantine laws

In order for people to bring their pet dog, cat or ferret into the UK from other countries, they must comply with UK pet quarantine laws. These rules are set to change as of 1 January 2012, when the UK brings its procedures into line with the European Union. Consequently, pet owners wishing to bring their pet(s) into the UK should be aware of both the current and the future pet quarantine laws.

Current pet quarantine laws

Rabies-susceptible animals, such as cats and dogs, must spend six months in quarantine if they do not qualify for entry into the UK under the current Pet Travel Scheme. This is because rabies has a long incubation period, necessitating a lengthy quarantine period.

If your pet does not qualify for entry into the UK under the Pet Travel Scheme, you will need to apply for an import licence in advance of your trip to the UK. This will require your pet to be met at the port or airport of disembarkation by an authorised carrying agent and taken to an approved quarantine premises in the UK for six calendar months from the date of its landing. You should be aware that your pet will be quarantined at your expense, and this can be very costly.

In order to qualify for entry into the UK under the Pet Travel Scheme (to avoid being licensed into quarantine), your pet will need to meet the rules of the scheme:

  • it should only be brought into the UK from EU and certain non-EU countries, and it must not have been to any unlisted countries in
  • the six months prior to their entry into the UK. For details on listed and unlisted countries, please visit DEFRA’s website;
  • it must be fitted with a microchip so it can be identified;
  • it must be vaccinated against rabies;
  • it must be blood tested after the vaccination;
  • appropriate documentation must be obtained – i.e. an EU pet passport, or an official third-country veterinary certificate;
  • the procedures above must take place in the UK or another qualifying (listed) country, except the microchip fitting, which can be
  • carried out anywhere; and
  • there must be a period of six months  between a satisfactory blood sample being taken, and the pet entering the UK.

All pets travelling from unlisted countries must be quarantined.

Pet quarantine laws from 1 January 2012

From 1 January 2012, pets will be able to enter the UK from EU and non-EU listed countries without quarantine, if:

  • they are microchipped;
  • they are vaccinated against rabies, followed by a waiting period of 21 days before entry into the UK;
  • appropriate pet travel documentation is obtained;
  • they are treated against tapeworm; and
  • they travel with an approved transport country on an authorised route.

From 1 January 2012, pets will also be able to enter the UK from unlisted countries without quarantine, if:

  • they are microchipped;
  • they are vaccinated;
  • a blood test is carried out to check that there is a satisfactory level of protection against rabies, followed by a three-month waiting
  • period before entry into the UK;
  • appropriate pet travel documentation is obtained;;
  • they are treated against tapeworm; and
  • they travel with an approved transport country on an authorised route.

Quarantine Premises

If your pet does require quarantine under the laws, you should choose a suitable and approved quarantine premises that ensures that your pet’s welfare needs are met. Ideally, it should be within easy or reasonable travelling distance from your home. 

Source:
FindLaw
Tags:
pet quarantine
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